Case Law

ICLR’s Law Reports: An Explainer

Case Law

It is fair to say that law reporting probably strikes quite a few people out there as being a rather arcane business. The purpose of this post is to try to make things a little less obscure by explaining the various types of law report published by ICLR. Whether you’re just about to begin studying Continue reading

The burden of proofs: why accuracy matters

Case Law

The published law reports in ICLR’s main subscription series are proof-read by at least three people, before being sent for approval by the judges on whose judgments they are based. So you can rest assured that our reports are as accurate, as a record of what the court considered and decided, as is humanly possible. Continue reading

Anatomy of a law report

Case Law

Any law reports, whether of the full text or summary type, needs to contain certain fundamental pieces of information in order to justify its being cited in support of a proposition of law. First of all, it must have a title, usually based on the names of the parties. It must identify the court giving Continue reading

What’s the difference between a “law report” and a “transcript”?

Case Law

What’s the difference between a “law report” and a “transcript”? This is one of those questions where the answer is as obvious to some as it is inconspicuous to others. It is also a question that may, quite reasonably, strike some as a bit pedantic. However, there is a distinction and it doesn’t hurt to be Continue reading

What is a Law Report?

Case Law

A law report is a record of a judicial decision on a point of law which sets a precedent. Not all decisions taken in a court of law set a precedent, however interesting they may be in terms of the facts of the case or its consequences. A decision is only reportable if lays down Continue reading

What is case law?

Case Law

Case law is the law created by the courts Although most laws are enacted by Parliament in the form of legislation, in a common law system such as ours the courts can also develop the law. By deciding a disputed point of law a senior court (known as a court of record) can change or Continue reading