Weekly Notes

Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 13 March 2015

This week’s coach tour of legal news and events from home and abroad includes a critical report on the legal aid cuts, a cornerstone (or plastic brick) that the builders rejected, a wigging from mooters on barristerial headgear, a proposal for a new (or not so new) music award, and a fined example of cultural insensitivity. Continue reading

Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 6 March 2015

This week’s salmagundi of legal news and events from home and abroad includes an update on parties’ election promises on law and justice, a look at some recent legislation, a response on judicial diversity, and a TV dramatist’s riposte to his pedantic legal critics.   Other recent publications of interest: Dinah Rose QC, What’s the Point Continue reading

Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 27 February 2015

This week’s tasty collation of legal news from home and abroad includes a global law summit and its discontents, a local lawyer-led lay-friendly family court information service, a couple of ministers short of a portfolio, and a quick data packet on net neutrality.   Global Law Summit Delegates pay cash for access If you had £1,500 to spare Continue reading

Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 20 February 2015

This week’s roundup of legal news from home and abroad includes a plan for online courts, a Lord Chief Justice sounding a note of pessimism, a national newspaper telegraphing its own decline, and a Taylor hoping to make a Swift buck. UPDATED 24 February: now with Law (and injustice) from around the world   Court Continue reading

Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 13 February 2015

This week’s selection of legal news and views from home and abroad includes a survey of grumpy judges, internet hate crime, prisoner voting wrongs and freedom of speech under fire. UPDATED 17 February 2015   Je Suis… So Confused Supine appeasement or sensible caution? “Offence is no offence” is a maxim often cited in response to Continue reading

Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 6 February 2015

This week’s curation of legal news from the netosphere includes a relaunch of the CSA inquiry, a rethink of QASA, a battle of jurisdiction over the hangman’s noose, a parade of privatisation problems and a tussle of Tudor Thomases. But first, some other recent posts of interest: Guest post by David Burrows: Family legal aid and funding: January Continue reading

Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 30 January 2015

This week’s buffet of legal news from home and abroad includes a reversal of policy from Labour and  reversals of the burden of proof from the government and the media (both mistaken), as well as a ditching of the dock by the LCJ and some more comical capers via the Clooneys. So stay tuned for Continue reading

Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 23 January 2015

This week’s litany of legal news from home and abroad includes a grilling of Grayling, a vindication of a vocal legend, a consultation over court fees, and a surveillance of snoops.   UPDATED 24 February 2015   Grayling grilled Smiling Justice Secretary appears confident of ultimate victory In a broadly sympathetic interview (more examination in chief than cross) the political columnist Andrew Continue reading

Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 16 January 2015

This week’s selection of legal news from home and abroad includes much that is related to or brought into focus by the terrorist attacks in Paris last week, such as questions about freedom of expression, respect for religion and other rights, and the tension between privacy and electronic intelligence gathering.   Other recent articles of interest: Eleanora Rosati Continue reading

Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 15 December 2014

The week’s selection of legal stories from home and abroad includes a simian entitlement to human rights, a juror’s entitlement to a hot lunch, and the public’s right to government information. Plus the Google tax and a veiled threat.   Other recent articles of interest: Dan Bunting, blog post about A conversation with the Lord Chief Justice John Bolch, Continue reading