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A rare find…

“Sound the ALARM Ping! goes the alarm signal in the lawyer’s mind, Stop! It says, there was something on this quite recently, But, where? It needn’t have been a case. An order, perhaps? Or some promise by a Minister? Anyhow, there was something. And the wise man turns to CURRENT LAW to check up. It Continue reading

The ICLR Annual Mooting Competition 2010-2011

On Wednesday 30th March 2011 the Open University took on the University of Exeter in the final of The ICLR Annual Mooting Competition. The prestigious event was held in the sumptuous Large Pension Room at Gray’s Inn, a space which offers the perfect setting for a legal debate. The Large Pension Room at Gray’s Inn Continue reading

A suitable case for tweetment (Part 2)

In a recent speech on open justice the Master of the Rolls added his support to the idea of tweeting from court. I welcome the Lord Chief Justice’s Interim Guidance on Tweeting in Courts. Without wanting to prejudge the contents of the Final Guidance, it seems to me that, subject again to proper safeguards, the Continue reading

Case search tips

The Case Search function on our new website is a powerful resource. Make sure you get the most out of it by following a few simple tips. ALL CASES search First, try entering in the Case name field as few words as possible. For example, try “Vesta” or “Vesta v Butcher” rather than “Forsikringsaktieselskapet Vesta Continue reading

Defending the Guilty

Those who have an interest in the lighter side of the law will be delighted that they now have access (from April 7, 2011) to the cheaper, Penguin reprint of “Defending the Guilty” subtitled “Truth and Lies in the Criminal Courtroom” by Alex McBride, for under £10. The author, a criminal barrister, and by that Continue reading

Is SILK too slick?

As a courtroom drama, Silk has much to recommend it. Whatever practitioners may tell you, most court cases are pretty dull, so you need a strong plot and a cast of larger than life characters to inject the necessary drama. Peter Moffatt, who scripted the series, has long form for this, including Kavanagh QC and Continue reading

A suitable case for tweetment?

Can the common law be developed by instant blogging? Should precedents be recorded by live updates on Twitter? That’s the surprising possibility conjured up in a recent Guardian Law Blog: There is something rather quaint about journalists in the 21st century using pens and notebooks to record what goes on in court hearings when the Continue reading