Archives

Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 26 February 2016

This week’s guided tour takes us behind the scenes at the BBC in the 1970s, to the more contemporary legal world of tribunals, prosecutors and the Supreme Court, and then back to the BBC for a mashed up glimpse of fictitious Victorian grime and detection.

(But, no doubt to everyone’s relief, nothing this week about the EU referendum. This will run and run and we see no point in mentioning more than once a month at most.) Reports Dame …

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Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 19 February 2016

This week’s roundup of legal news and commentary includes the opening of the referendum season, the passing of two literary giants, the correction of a 30-year misdirection, and a new guide to Chancery practice. Plus Apple v FBI writ.

 

EU referendum In / Out / Shake it all about

The Prime Minister David Cameron spent much of this week in negotiations with his European counterparts, attempting to get a “deal” he could present to the …

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The Crime Museum

The Crime Museum is a collection of objects and documents preserved by the police from crimes they have investigated. It used to be called the Police Museum and is based at New Scotland Yard. A selection of its contents forms the basis of an exhibition currently (until 10 April 2016) on display at the Museum of London. Paul Magrath went to see it.

The Police Museum began, some time in the 1870s, from a collection of …

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Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 12 February

This week’s roundup of legal news and comment includes a new approach to prisons, notes and queries on court reporting, two legal issues on internet links and the end of the Indy.

Prison reform Prime Minister outlines plan for reform of prisons

On 8 February David Cameron spoke at the Policy Exchange on prison reform including plans to give governors complete control over the way they run their prisons. You can read the text of his speech here. Salient …

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Expanding The Weekly Law Reports – Introducing Volume 4

Expanding The Weekly Law Reports – Introducing Volume 4

We are pleased to announce a significant expansion in the coverage offered by The Weekly Law Reports.

Since it entered circulation in 1953, The Weekly Law Reports has provided the most up to date and comprehensive generalist coverage of law-changing judgments in England and Wales.

Over the past 63 years, the volume of cases entering the English justice system has grown relentlessly. There is far more law to keep abreast of in 2016 than ever before. As law reporters, this …

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Case Law: Ewing v Cardiff Crown Court, The taking of notes in court does not require judicial permission – Hugh Tomlinson QC

Case Comment

In the case of Ewing v Crown Court sitting at Cardiff and Newport [2016] EWHC 183 (Admin); [2016] WLR(D) 62  the Divisional Court confirmed an important feature of the open justice principle: that permission is not needed in order to take notes in Court. Although the Court may, for good reason, withdraw the liberty to take notes, the default position is that anyone who attends a public hearing is free to take notes.

Background

The claim arose out …

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Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 5 February 2016

This week’s roundup of legal news and commentary includes the arbitrary detention of Assange; the ever-receding British Bill of Rights; a radio programme about divorce; matters of judgment, judgement (with an e) and instinct; and the future of electoral law. Inter, as they say, alia. [Updated 8 Feb].

 

Human rights UN working group finds Assange in “arbitrary” detention

Julian Assange, who has evaded extradition to Sweden by seeking sanctuary in the Ecuadorian embassy in London, has complained about his situation …

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Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 29 January 2016

This week’s roundup of legal news and commentary includes Lord Chancellor’s legal aid U-turn, a parliamentary look at the court fees hike, a welcome piloting of transparency in the Court of Protection, and some good and bad news on diversity.

 

Criminal Legal Aid Gove’s dramatic U-turn poses question

And the question is: what next? The Lord Chancellor Michael Gove has already u-turned a number of policies introduced by his predecessor, Chris Grayling, including the so-called …

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