Archives

Case Law On Trial – the results: 1971-1995

To commemorate the fact that ICLR has been creating case history for the last 150 years, we’re putting together a special Anniversary Edition of the Law Reports, which will include the 15 top cases voted for by you, our readers. We divided our history into five periods, and allowed a month for you to vote for a case from each period. In this post, we look at the results from the fourth period, 1971-1995.

 

 

 

The vote for this period …

Continue Reading

Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 25 September 2015

This week’s roundup of legal news and events includes Lord Sumption’s assumption, Jeremy Corbyn’s legal team, Gove’s policy revisions, and two Transparency Project investigations. Plus human rights in foreign parts and a porcine speculation.

 

Judicial diversity Lord Sumption makes an assumption

In modern Britain, the fastest way to make enemies is to deliver a public lecture about judicial diversity.

Prescient words, you may think, after this week, when the man who uttered them back in 2012 (at the beginning …

Continue Reading

Case Law On Trial – the results: 1946-1970

To commemorate the fact that ICLR has been creating case history for the last 150 years, we’re putting together a special Anniversary Edition of the Law Reports, which will include the 15 top cases voted for by you, our readers. We divided our history into five periods, and allowed a month for you to vote for a case from each period. In this post, we look at the results from the third period, 1946-1970.

The top two cases are both clear winners, in first and …

Continue Reading

Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 18 September 2015

The latest buffet of legal news and events includes confusion over sex cases, the heroic resistance of art to official state stupidity, and links to some interesting reading and lectures. And over the next week Team ICLR is in Berlin, to record its impressions of international librarianship.

 

Ai Weiwei at the RA Prisoner of conscience makes art that challenges official state stupidity

The Chinese artist Ai Weiwei has been subject to intense and intensive surveillance, scrutiny and harassment, as well as spells …

Continue Reading

Case Law On Trial – the results: 1915-1945

To commemorate the fact that ICLR has been creating case history for the last 150 years, we’re putting together a special Anniversary Edition of the Law Reports, which will include the 15 top cases voted for by you, our readers. We divided our history into five periods, and allowed a month for you to vote for a case from each period. In this post, we look at the results from the second period, 1915-1945.

 

 

 

As this graphic shows, the …

Continue Reading

Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 11 September 2015

This week’s collection of legal news and related matters includes the legality of drone strikes, the fate of Just Solutions, the future of human rights legislation and the decline and fall of English literature’s most controversial novel.

 

Legality of drone strikes Is there a Kill List?

The announcement by David Cameron in the House of Commons on Monday last week that a remotely operated drone had delivered a fatal missile strike on 21 August against two British citizens …

Continue Reading

Human Rights: can we go it alone?

“Take it from me – the Human Rights Act is toast.” Martin Howe QC.

Last night the International Bar Association’s Human Rights Institute (IBAHRI) held a debate, hosted at Gray’s Inn, on the subject: Human Rights: can we go it alone?

The speakers were:

Sir Keir Starmer QC MP, a human rights barrister and former Director of Public Prosecutions, now a Labour MP, who defended the Human Rights Act 1998 and the continued role of European Court …

Continue Reading

Case Law On Trial – the results: 1865 – 1914

To commemorate the fact that ICLR has been creating case history for the last 150 years, we’re putting together a special Anniversary Edition of the Law Reports, which will include the 15 top cases voted for by you, our readers. We divided our history into five periods, and allowed a month for you to vote for a case from each period. In this post, we look at the results from the first period, 1865 – 1914.

As this graphic shows, the choice of the top …

Continue Reading

Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 4 September 2015

We resume our weekly survey of legal news and events with a catchup of what’s been happening over the vacation, both at home and abroad.

 

Red Queen redux What does acquitted phonehacking defendant Rebekah Brooks’ reinstallation as chief executive at News Corp UK say about money, Murdoch and management?

Reading Beyond Contempt, Peter Jukes’ eyewitness account of the phonehacking trial, one was struck by his guarded admiration for the alleged queen of misrule, Rebekah Brooks, who was supposedly …

Continue Reading