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Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 31 October 2014

Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 31 October 2014

In this week’s selection of legal stories and “snippets” from home and abroad, the Home Secretary loses a chair, the Justice Secretary loses a vote, the Bar gains another training programme and human rights protection is linked to written-constitutionalism via a Tory think tank discussion. And despite its being Halloween, some ghoulish bad guys get their just deserts overseas.

 

Other recent items of interest: Frederick Wilmot-Smith discussing legal aid as a pillar of the welfare state, on the LRB website: Necessity or …

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CSA Inquiry – will chair be shown the door?

CSA Inquiry – will chair be shown the door?

Fiona Woolf, who has been appointed to chair the government inquiry into historic child sex abuse (CSA), recently appeared before the Home Affairs Select Committee of the House of Commons, effectively to answer the charge that she was not a suitable or proper person to undertake the role.

She was appointed after the resignation of the initial appointee, Lady Butler-Sloss, whose late brother, Sir Michael Havers had been Attorney General in Mrs Thatcher’s government, and might have been the …

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Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 24 October 2014

Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 24 October 2014

This week’s selection of legal stories from home and abroad includes ideas for putting more cameras in court and fewer lawyers, and some really terrible tales about injustice under legal systems less benign than our own. Please note that puns cost nothing extra and are employed solely to grab attention for a worthy topic. Other recent posts of interest: Review (on this blog) of Afternoon Drama: “Beyond Contempt” by Peter Jukes Mary-Rachel McCabe on The Justice Gap: Victims’ …

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Afternoon Drama: “Beyond Contempt” by Peter Jukes

Reviews

Reviewed by Paul Magrath

 

Described by some as the Trial of the Century, it took up eight months of court time at the Central Criminal Court, Old Bailey and allegedly cost £100m. Its 130 days of testimony disclosed evidence of some of the most shocking conduct by journalists at the News of the World, much of which had already been exposed in the media, but it also brought forth fresh revelations, such as the love affair between two former …

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Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 17 October 2014

This week’s confection of legal fancies includes a couple of birthday cakes, a pie chart, and some half-baked ideas from politicians, as well as some rather bitter offerings from less fortunate jurisdictions.

UPDATED; 19 October 2014

 

Five years young: the UK Supreme Court This month marks the fifth anniversary of the first hearings by the United Kingdom Supreme Court.

Its first judgment, In re appeals by Governing Body of JFS  [2009] UKSC 1; [2009] 1 WLR 2353

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Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 10 October 2014

Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 10 October 2014

This week’s roundup of legal news from home and abroad includes more on the war on Human Rights, a nasty case of vigilante justice, an amusing case of voter ignorance and a comment on the citation of cartoon quotations.

 

Other recent content of interest: 

The Children Act by Ian McEwan, reviewed by Paul Magrath Cats, genies and stable doors, by Sarah P on the Transparency Project (about the impact of social media on efforts to protect the anonymity …

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The Children Act by Ian McEwan

The Children Act by Ian McEwan

Reviewed by Paul Magrath

 

Ian McEwan’s latest novel, The Children Act, is named after a statute; and the story it tells is about a High Court judge. But its true purpose seems to be to provide a literary appreciation of the art of writing judgments. Not just any old judgments, though. For McEwan seems particularly interested in cases involving conflicts between legal rights and religious obligations. Thus, at the heart of this book is a case involving …

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Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 3 October 2014

This week’s selection of law and injustice from home and abroad includes a Human Rights Act rethink, a peaceful pro-democracy protest movement, a prose appraisal of the best of the Bar and a poetic appraisal of Google’s cack-fisted attempts to implement the Right to Deletion of Dubious Data-links, otherwise known as RTBF. HRA replacement therapy

The high point of this week’s Tory Party conference in Birmingham (or the low point if you don’t happen to be a right wing fundamentalist …

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