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Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 29 August 2014

Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 29 August 2014

This week’s roundup looks at open justice, transparency, the independence of a sometimes outspoken judiciary, and the risk of removing special canteens in the criminal court. Plus the usual survey of law and injustice in foreign parts. Also on the blog this week: Terror makes tyrants of us all: Boris and the Reverse Burden proposal Judges, Journalists and Open Justice This was the sub-title of a speech given by Lord Neuberger of Abbotsbury, President of the UK Supreme Court (right, …

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Terror makes tyrants of us all: Boris and the Reverse Burden proposal

If a thing is worth doing, it’s worth doing properly. If a right is worth having, it’s worth protecting that right in wartime, peacetime and any time in between.

 

In a civilised and democratic society, such as we all claim to want to protect, the presumption of individual liberty does not simply evaporate as a matter of executive convenience. Its removal requires some very compelling justification.

Take it on good authority, as recorded in the Law Reports: Lord …

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Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 22 August 2014

Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 22 August 2014

This week’s selection looks like a Bank Holiday Celebrity Special, with Cliff Richard and the shadows of controversy, Julian Assange and his novel predicament, and Shakespeare’s fatal injunction challenged. Plus law and injustice from around the globe.

UPDATED: 26 August 2014

 

We’re all going on a summer holiday… …while the cops grab a warrant to search our homes with extreme (BBC) prejudice.

Last week the police swooped on the Berkshire home of Sir Cliff Richard in execution of …

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Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 15 August 2014

Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 15 August 2014

With this week’s roundup of legal news from home and abroad we get into another Vine mess over copyright, we pit an unstoppable force against an immovable object, we question the value of victim statements and we look back in anger at the miscarriages of justice before the ending of the death penalty.

 

Another Vine mess…

The Premier League has rushed in where FIFA did not fear to tread – issuing its own warning to football fans against the posting …

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Sex crimes, murder and the death penalty: “A Matter for the Jury”, by Peter Murphy

Reviewed by Paul Magrath

When the life of an accused man hangs in the balance, even a point of statutory construction can be turned to nail-biting drama.

In A Matter for the Jury, Peter Murphy continues the story of Ben Schroeder, a young barrister in the 1960s, with a tense account of his first murder trial. It was a time when the death penalty still applied in certain cases, and this is one of them, allegedly: a …

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Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 8 August 2014

Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 8 August 2014

This week’s roundup of legal news from home and abroad goes “in camera” to see who put the ape into aperture, gets court in the cross-fire of legal funding, and notes how a fake sheikh’s fakery led to a shakeup of more than 30 criminal cases. There’s also a bumper crop of tales of injustice from around the world.

 

Snap judgment on simian selfie

Lots of commentators have given us their opinions (in which, being human, they own copyright) on …

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Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 4 August 2014

Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 4 August 2014

The ICLR’s weekly roundup of legal news from home and abroad resumes after a brief holiday, with tales of legal aid, legal hindrance and a legal (omni)shambles, among other topical matters. And don’t forget: ICLR Criminal Law Updater (July 2014)  Internet Newsletter for Lawyers (July 2014) Legal Aid turns 65

The Legal Aid and Advice Bill received Royal assent on 30 July 1949, notes Legal Voice’s Justice …

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