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Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 30 May 2014

A selection of topical legal news from the UK and around the world, including the historic dispute over the mortal remains of the last Plantagenet king, a consultation over hate crime, the continuing saga of legal aid cuts and the criminal justice system, and tales of justice (or injustice) in foreign parts. Other recent posts from ICLR:

Speed dealing: Flash Boys and the world of high frequency trading, a review of Michael Lewis’s expose of the sharks in the …

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CALLing Winnipeg: ICLR at the Canadian Association of Law Libraries annual conference

CALLing Winnipeg: ICLR at the Canadian Association of Law Libraries annual conference

By Rebecca Herle, Head of Marketing Welcome to Winnipeg

Cosily known as the “Little Chicago” of Canada by its visitors and more fondly as the ‘Peg’ by its inhabitants, Winnipeg is the third largest Canadian city. On first impressions it would appear the poorer of its two bigger siblings, Toronto and Montreal, and a little more rough around the edges – one can only guess that this is perhaps where the euphemism “Little Chicago” was derived.

The word Winnipeg …

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Speed dealing: Flash Boys and the world of high frequency trading

Flash Boys, by Michael Lewis

reviewed by Paul Magrath

Few authors can claim to have set in train an investigation by the FBI, but Michael Lewis’s latest book, Flash Boys, has done just that after exposing some of the more dubious practices associated with High Frequency Trading (HFT) on the US securities market. Nor is the problem confined to the USA, as demonstrated by recent action taken by both the UK’s Financial Conduct Authority and the EU’s Financial Services …

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Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 23 May 2014

Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 23 May 2014

A weekly roundup of topical legal news from the UK and around the world, including Afghanistan, Pakistan, South Africa, Spain and the USA. Afghanistan

The appeal of a British marine, initially tried by court martial as “Marine A” but later revealed to be Sgt Alexander Blackman, against his conviction for murder was dismissed by the Court of Appeal in a judgment given yesterday: R v Blackman (Secretary of State for Defence intervening) [2014] EWCA Civ 1029.

The case …

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PDS, PDQ! Operation Cotton and Operation (saving the MOJ’s) Bacon

Legal Profession

Yesterday the Court of Appeal  roundly allowed an appeal by the prosecuting authority and the Secretary of State for Justice (intervening, or as some might suggest, interfering) against the trial judge’s decision to stay a major fraud case by reason of the unavailability of counsel for five legally aided defendants. The case has aroused a good deal of controversy. For earlier coverage on this site, see our Weekly Notes for 9 May with an update in the last Weekly …

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Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 16 May 2014

Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 16 May 2014

A weekly roundup of topical legal news, including the continuing VHCC saga, a review of criminal advocacy (or what might be left of it), and a torrent of historical “divorce porn” from the new Family Court. But first, that “unforgettable” google ruling from the ECJ. You have a right to remain silent, thanks to Magna Carta, and now you have a right to be forgotten — online at least. This right, exercised with ease  by so many characters in popular …

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The Verdict, by Nick Stone

Reviewed by Paul Magrath

 

When the drugged, strangled corpse of a blonde in a green dress is found in the bedroom of hedge fund honcho Vernon James’s trashed hotel suite, the morning after the gala awards ceremony where he was awarded the Ethical Man of the Year prize, his protestations of innocence meet a wall of unbelief.

When further evidence emerges showing that the victim was drugged with rohypnol and that Vernon has a history of injuring escort …

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Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 9 May 2014

Weekly Notes: legal news from ICLR – 9 May 2014

A weekly roundup of topical legal news This week’s stories deal largely with issues of representation: its quality (if you can get it) and what happens if you can’t. Operation Cotton Over the past week, there’s been a lot of commentary on the collapse of a major fraud trial, owing to the lack of suitable representation for the defendants. Though loosely referred to as Operation Cotton (or, on Twitter, #OpCotton) the case is actually titled Regina v Crawley and others. …

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Constance Briscoe brought to book: a sad end to a promising legal career

Constance Briscoe brought to book: a sad end to a promising legal career

The news that an experienced criminal barrister and part-time judge, Constance Briscoe, has been sentenced to 16 months in prison for three offences of perverting the course of justice has prompted widespread comment and, in some quarters, indignation. The fact of her conviction for such an offence was certainly shocking, given her hitherto promising career and the obstacles which (on her account, about which more below) she had to overcome. It brings that career to an abrupt end and destroys …

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