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The end of the road for the Common Law?

The end of the road for the Common Law?

“The law reports are replete with examples of important judicial law-making in diverse areas affecting many aspects of our national life.”

So said the Master of the Rolls, Lord Dyson in a recent speech. But for how much longer can this continue?

King Henry II (1133 – 1189): his legal reforms laid the basis for the English Common Law

The “living instrument” of the common law, which has been in continuous development since the┬áreign of Henry II, is …

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The C-section case: final chapter

The C-section case: final chapter

In an earlier post, The Curious Case of The Court, The Commentators, The Woman, and Her Baby, we considered the story, widely and hysterically covered in the media, and more rationally by legal bloggers, of a pregnant Italian woman who had visited the UK in the summer 2012 only to be “sectioned” under the Mental Health Act and then C-sectioned, pursuant to a court order (ie involuntarily required to submit to a Caesarean birth), apparently to protect her …

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Privatised civil justice – how it might look

Privatised civil justice – how it might look

Artist’s impressions

A shadowy and mysterious legal think tank known as the Seven Stars Symposium has recently announced proposals for the privatisation of the litigation services currently provided by the High Court of England and Wales and the County Courts.

In a press release issued on 1 April, it outlined the following key features of the plan:

All private civil law claims to be determined by one of …

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